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Clear skies. Low 61F. Winds WNW at 10 to 15 mph.
Updated: September 14, 2022 @ 4:34 pm
‘Shipwrecks’ from Alexis Rockman’s Art@Bainbridge exhibit.
Princeton University fellow Mark Thomas Gibson exhibits his work at the Lewis Center beginning October 27.
Wendell T. Brooks’ ‘Homage to Jesse Owens,’ part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s ‘Circle of Black Artists’ exhibit.
Carrie Mae Weems is the artist behind ‘Carrie Mae Weems: The Usual Suspects’ on view at The College of New Jersey.
Faith Ringgold’s ‘Sunflower’ from ‘Collective Yearning: Black Women Artists from the Zimmerli Art Museum’ by the Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities.
Sneaker artist Dez FlyKickz in her Trenton studio.
Andres Muñoz’s ‘Apetito Nocturno’ won ‘Honorable Mention – Photography’ at the the Trenton City Museum’s Ellarsie Open.
‘Vanitas’ by Philip Carroll is on display at Trenton City Museum’s Ellarsie Open.
“Growing Sideways: School Days” is an exhibition by Catalina Schliebener now on display at the Princeton Day School.

Andres Muñoz’s ‘Apetito Nocturno’ won ‘Honorable Mention – Photography’ at the the Trenton City Museum’s Ellarsie Open.
The fall visual art season arrives with a combination of continuing and new exhibitions that range from large exhibitions of new art by state and regional artists, a look at the contributions of Black artists in the region, and the art of tattooing.
Here’s a look of just some of the things that are happening:
Museums and Exhibition Centers
Grounds For Sculpture
The internationally known sculpture center is continuing two exhibitions this fall as well as preparing a second iteration of a site-specific light installation.
“Roberto Lugo: The Village Potter,” running through the remainder of 2022, offers visitors the opportunity to physically engage with — and even enter — the often-larger-than-life ceramic works by this contemporary master from Philadelphia whose ground changing works are part of the collections of the Philadelphia and Metropolitan museums of art.
“Fragile: Earth,” featuring the work of the 16 artists selected through The Color Network, also remains on view to showcase the works of artists representing a variety of social, cultural, geographical, and racial backgrounds and whose works serve as a catalyst for “trauma-informed art sessions, ESL/Spanish workshops, urban gardening, and professional development.”
Then look for “Night Forms: Infinite Wave.” It is the second installment of 2021’s site-specific art and light event by Ricardo Rivera and the Klip Collective. Once again, the project — opening on November 25 — uses the GFS artwork and landscape as the canvas for new temporal art designs created in digital light and sound.
126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton. 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org.
Morven Museum and Garden
The regional and New Jersey centric exhibition venue continues with its current show, “Ma Bell: The Mother of Invention in New Jersey.” It features original historical artifacts to the discoveries, products, and fields of work that happened at the Bell Telephone labs in New Jersey from the 1920s to the mid-1980s.
55 Stockton Street, Princeton. 609-924-8144. www.morven.org.
New Jersey State Museum
The current New Jersey Arts Annual, titled “Reemergence” also continues through April, 2023. The exhibition features 127 works by 95 New Jersey artists who coordinators say explore the ongoing “pandemic, political and ideological polarization, and a collective reckoning with systemic racism.”
205 West State Street, Trenton. 609- 292-6300. www.statemuseum.nj.gov.
Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie Mansion
‘Vanitas’ by Philip Carroll is on display at Trenton City Museum’s Ellarsie Open.
The “Ellarslie Open,” the Trenton City Museum’s annual juried show, continues showcasing the works of 134 artists from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New York, through October 2. This year’s juror was Walter Wickiser of the Walter Wickiser Gallery in New York City.
Cadwalader Park, Trenton. 609-989-3632. www.ellarslie.org.
Arts Council of Princeton
“Women On The Wall,” features the artwork of Wendy Gordon, a Lambertville-based artist who explores natural structures, and Karen Titus Smith, a Pemberton artist whose creates two-dimensional images inspired by nature, surroundings, and current events. An opening reception is set for Saturday, September 17, 3 to 5 p.m. The works are on view through October 8.
“INKED!”is an exhibition presented in conjunction with the opening of the Glucksberg Printing Project at the Arts Council’s Paul Robeson Center for the Arts. Developed in the memory of the late Trudy Glucksberg, an accomplished printmaker and longtime ACP volunteer, INKED! celebrates the work of five notable printmakers spanning techniques, inspirations, and philosophies around printmaking: Celia Connaire, David Dimarchi, Eileen Foti, Elizabeth Massa, and Trudy Glucksberg. Opening reception: Saturday, September 17, 3 to 5 p.m.
Then look for “Retrieving the Life and Art of James Wilson Edwards and a Circle Of Black Artists.” Curated by Princeton artist and professor Judith K. Brodsky and Princeton artist and attorney Rhinold Ponder, exhibition features Wilson’s work along with other regional artists of African ancestry: James Wilson Edwards, Rex Goreleigh, Hughie Lee-Smith, Selma Hortense Burke, Wendell T. Brooks. It opens on October 14, with the panel, “Art Collecting as an Act of Love, Resistance and Preservation of History,” 4 to 5 p.m. A reception follows.
Wendell T. Brooks’ ‘Homage to Jesse Owens,’ part of the Arts Council of Princeton’s ‘Circle of Black Artists’ exhibit.
Other exhibition-related public programs include: “Symposium: How Museums Are Diversifying Their Collections to Include Black and Brown Artists,” 5 to 7 p.m., Thursday, November 3, and “Panel: Restoring the Overlooked History of Black Artists in Princeton and Trenton in the Later 20th Century Through Local Research, Preservation, and Oral History,” on Wednesday, November 30.
102 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. 609-924-8777. www.artscouncilof­princeton.org.
West Windsor Arts Council
Trenton Community A-Team, the self-taught artists who began working at the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, is mounting an exhibition featuring the visionary art work of John Hayes, Carol Johnson, Deborah Kisela, Lisa Lewis, Ethel Mack, Frankie Mack, Herman “Shorty” Rose, Charles “Cha Cha” Smith, Demond Williams, and Emery Williams through October 29. Opening Sunday, September 11, 4 to 6 p.m. Free.
952 Alexander Road, West Windsor. www.westwindsorarts.org.
Gallery 14
The nonprofit photography collaborative opens its season with “‘Best of the Best’ Members Show” with works by Alina Marin-Bliach, Princeton Junction; John Clarke, Pennington; Alice Grebanier, Branchburg; Larry Parsons, Princeton; Charles Miller, Ringoes; Philip “Dutch” Bagley, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania; Martin Schwartz, East Windsor; Joel Blum, East Windsor; John Stritzinger, Elkins Park; Mary Leck, Kendall Park; Barbara Warren, Yardley; David Ackerman, Hopewell; and Bennett Povlow, Elkins Park. On view September 10 through October 2, with a meet the artists reception set for Sunday, September 11, 1 to 3 p.m. Free.
14 Mercer Street, Hopewell. 609-333-8511. www.gallery14.org.
Artworks Trenton
“Bold Will Hold,” created in partnership with the Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market, is an exhibition that will showcase tattoo and traditional artists inspired by tattoo culture. An opening reception is set for Friday, November 4, from 6 to 9 p.m. and continues through November 19.
19 Everett Alley, Trenton, 609-394-9436. www.artworkstrenton.org.
Schools, Colleges, and Universities
Princeton University Art Museum’s Art@Bainbridge
“Alexis Rockman: Shipwrecks,” runs September 24 through November 27. The New York-based artist, born 1962, uses watercolor and large canvases to re-envisions shipwrecks and highlights the planetary implications of the forces behind the wrecks, including trade, migration, colonization, and globalization.
‘Shipwrecks’ from Alexis Rockman’s Art@Bainbridge exhibit.
158 Nassau Street, Princeton. Tuesday and Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Princeton University Art Museum’s Art on Hulfish
“Time’s Relentless Melt” is currently on view through November 6. PUAM press materials say the exhibition “presents photographic and time-based works that grapple with time as multifaceted — linear, cyclical, disjointed, or compressed — and explore the tension between transience and permanence, between recording and remembering. Works on view include Katie Paterson’s visualizations of cosmological time, Andy Goldsworthy’s performances with nature, and Dawoud’s Bey’s commemorations of lives lost.”
11 Hulfish Street, Princeton. Monday through Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday noon to 5 p.m. Free. www.artmuseum.princeton.edu.
The College of New Jersey Art Gallery
“Carrie Mae Weems: The Usual Suspects” includes recent photographic and video works questioning stereotypes that associate black bodies with criminality.
Carrie Mae Weems is the artist behind ‘Carrie Mae Weems: The Usual Suspects’ on view at The College of New Jersey.
Weems is the recipient of a Mac­Arthur Foundation grant, Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award, Prix de Roma, National Endowment of the Arts fellowship, the Tiffany Awards, and other awards. Organized by Louisiana State University Museum of Art, the show includes recent photographic and video works questioning stereotypes that associate black bodies with criminality. A panel discussion is set for Wednesday, September 14, from 5 to 6 p.m., with a reception to follow. On view through October 30. Programs are free.
Art & Interactive Multimedia Building, College of New Jersey, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing. 609-771-2633. tcnjartgallery.tcnj.edu.
The Zimmerli Museum
“American Stories: Gifts from the Jersey City Museum Collection” opens the season with a look at the collection that was gifted to the Zimmerli in 2018 and, say coordinators, “expands the scope and strength of the Art of the Americas collection of paintings, sculptures, prints, and photographs, including many artists who lived or worked in New Jersey.” That includes artists Chakaia Booker, Mel Edwards, Luis Cruz Azaceta, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, and Juan Sánchez.
Also on the schedule is “Stand Up! 10 Mighty Women Who Made a Change,” an exhibition based on the illustrations and preparatory materials of the book of the same name with texts by Brittney Cooper, Rutgers professor of gender and African studies, and illustrator Cathy Ann Johnson.
71 Hamilton Street, New Brunswick, 848-932-7237. zimmerlimuseum.rutgers.edu.
Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities
“Collective Yearning: Black Women Artists from the Zimmerli Art Museum” is the fruit of the university’s comprehensive review of its art by Black women artists. Curated by Dr. Amber Wiley, Rutgers assistant professor of art history, and her students, the exhibition features work by noted American artists Emma Amos, Chakaia Booker, Nell Painter, Faith Ringgold, Betye Saar, Carrie Mae Weems, and others. Currently on view through December 14.
Faith Ringgold’s ‘Sunflower’ from ‘Collective Yearning: Black Women Artists from the Zimmerli Art Museum’ by the Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities.
Mary H. Dana Women Artists Series Galleries, Douglass Library, 8 Chapel Drive, New Brunswick, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. free. cwah.rutgers.edu.
Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts
“An exhibition by Mark Thomas Gibson,” artist, Princeton Hodder Fellow, and 2022 Guggenheim Fellow Gibson presents recent work “through a personal lens on American culture that stems from his multipartite viewpoint as an artist — as a Black male, a professor, and an American history buff.”
Hurley Gallery at Lewis Arts complex. October 27 through November 27, Opening reception Thursday, October 27, 4 to 8 p.m. Artist talk Thursday, November 17, 4:30 p.m. Free. 122 Alexander Street, Princeton, arts.princeton.edu.
Princeton University fellow Mark Thomas Gibson exhibits his work at the Lewis Center beginning October 27.
Princeton Day School
“Growing Sideways: School Days” is an exhibition by Chilean-born, Brooklyn-based artist Catalina Schliebener who works with collage, large-scale mural, and multi-media installations. The title was inspired by author Kathryn Bond Stockton’s 2009 “The Queer Child, or Growing Sideways in the Twentieth Century” and provides the opportunity for the artist to lead “the viewer through a personal and wonderfully relatable journey back through the abstraction of childhood.” A reception is set for Thursday, September 15, 5 to 7 p.m., and the exhibition remains on view through December 9.
650 Great Road, Princeton. 609- 924-6700. www.pds.org.
“Growing Sideways: School Days” is an exhibition by Catalina Schliebener now on display at the Princeton Day School.
Libraries
Milberg Gallery at Firestone Library, Princeton University
“Records of Resistance: Documenting Global Activism 1933 to 2021” visually examines a variety of active responses to systems of repression. The exhibition includes posters, pamphlets, and flyers and, according to coordinators, will provide views with encountering “new ways of disseminating dissent as activists harness the power of the internet and social media to make their voices heard.” Currently on view daily from noon to 6 p.m. through December 11. Free. library.princeton.edu/events/exhibitions.
Trenton Free Public Library
“Trenton Artists Workshop Association Past Presidents” featuring work by active capital city area artists Liz Aubrey, Rob Girandola, Aubrey J. Kauffman, Robert Lowe, Dave Orban, and Mary Yess, through October 1.
Sneaker artist Dez FlyKickz in her Trenton studio.
It will be followed by a “Trenton Artists” show featuring works by Leon Rainbow and Dez FlyKickz. October 4 through November 1.
120 Academy Street, Trenton, Mondays through Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Friday and Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. www.trentonlib.org.
Galleries in Preparation
At press time, the following important regional galleries have not released information on their new exhibition, but are worth keeping an eye on what they have planned:
JKC Gallery, James Kerney Campus, Mercer County Community College, Trenton Hall Annex, 137 North Broad Street, Trenton. 609-586-4800. www.mccc.edu/community_gallery_jkc.shtml
Mercer County Community College Gallery, Communications Building, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. www.mccc.edu/gallery.
Rider University Art Gallery was closed and has yet to reopen, despite a website notice that it was in the process of being moved, Rider University, Lawrenceville, 609-896-5168 or www.rider.edu/arts.

U.S. 1’s Fall Arts Preview returns for 2022 with shows, exhibits, concerts and screenings from around the Mercer County area.
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