CULTURE
Museum ethics scrutinized
This year’s Taiwan International Human Rights Film Festival, which begins on Friday, aims to explore the ethical questions surrounding the ownership of museum collections, the organizers said. Under the themes “Whose Museum?” and “Human Rights Panorama,” the National Human Rights Museum (NHRM) has curated screenings of 11 films highlighting the educational role of museums and the political conflicts over appropriated cultural artifacts. One of the festival’s more topical inclusions is Dutch director Oeke Hoogendijk’s The Treasures of Crimea, which documents the geopolitical wrangling over a collection of historical artifacts from Ukraine stranded in an Amsterdam museum following Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014. Admission is free, with ticket information available on the festival’s Web site. An online version of the festival is also to be held from Monday next week to Oct. 10.
DEFENSE
Uncrewed plane appears
Two Chinese aircraft flew into the southwestern part of Taiwan’s air defense identification zone on Saturday, one of which was a Rainbow CH-4 remote-controlled combat aerial vehicle, reportedly detected by Taiwan for the first time. Developed by China Aerospace Science and Technology, the CH-4 has a cruising speed of up to 180kph and a flight range of 3,500km. The other was a Y8 anti-submarine warplane, the Ministry of National Defense said. The two aircraft were among 20 Chinese aircraft and five naval ships detected in Taiwan’s vicinity on Saturday, the ministry said, adding that it scrambled combat air and naval patrols, and deployed defense missile systems in response. The ministry did not disclose the flight paths of the other 18 aircraft or the locations of the naval vessels.
TRAVEL
Island cruises proposed
Taiwan is working with international partners to develop pan-Asian island-hopping cruise vacations to revive the travel market, Ministry of Transportation and Communications Deputy Minister Chi Wen-chung (祁文中) said. At a cruise industry forum on Tuesday last week, Chi said that Taiwan is eyeing the formation of an “Asian archipelago cruise alliance” to organize routes along the East Asian island chain between South Korea and Indonesia. The ministry recently upgraded tourist center facilities and streamlined disease control measures at ports in Keelung and Kaohsiung, he said. Taiwan has been the second-largest cruise market in Asia, with about 1.06 million international travelers from 600 cruise ships arriving each year before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.
TRAVEL
CAL opens Cebu, Thai routes
China Airlines (CAL) announced last week that it would soon launch direct flights from Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport to Cebu in the Philippines and Chiang Mai in Thailand. The Taiwanese carrier said flights to Cebu, the second-largest city in the Philippines, would depart four days a week starting Dec. 1. The flights, which are to use an Airbus A321neo, are slated to depart at 7:40am. and arrive in Cebu at 10:35am, with return flights departing the Philippines at 11:35am, CAL said. Flights to Chiang Mai are set to begin on Jan. 20 on an A321neo, departing at 7:50am four days a week, arriving at 11am and departing Thailand at noon.
BOOK OF MESSAGES: People lined up at the UK’s representative office in Taipei to ‘pay tribute to the queen’s contributions and devotion throughout her life’ Taiwan would not receive an official invitation to Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral on Monday next week due to a lack of official ties with the UK, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said yesterday. However, the government has expressed its wish to mourn the death of the queen on behalf of its people in other “appropriate ways,” Department of European Affairs Director-General Remus Chen (陳立國) said. “We are still waiting for an official response from the UK side and will make a public announcement once a final confirmation is made,” Chen said. According to the British government’s guidance, only nations with which the UK
The government urged people to stay calm and keep safe when they receive text messages on Wednesday next week to simulate warnings of an earthquake and tsunami as part of drills to observe the 23rd anniversary of the deadly 921 Earthquake. Two text messages are to be sent to mobile phone users on Wednesday warning of an earthquake at 9:21am and a tsunami at 9:25am, a statement issued by the Ministry of the Interior yesterday showed. In the simulated scenario, a magnitude 8.0 undersea earthquake would strike the east coast at 9:21am and trigger a tsunami at 9:25am, causing buildings to collapse,
TAITUNG EPICENTER: Yesterday’s earthquake originated from a rigid plate formation that produces fewer quakes, but had built up decades of seismic energy, the CWB said People should be prepared for further damage caused by aftershocks following a magnitude 6.8 earthquake at 2:44pm yesterday, although its aftershocks are expected to be of smaller magnitude and occur less frequently than yesterday’s quakes, the Central Weather Bureau (CWB) said yesterday. Bureau data showed that the quake’s epicenter was 42.7km north of Taitung County Hall at a depth of 7km, which is within Taitung’s Chihshang Township (池上). The magnitude 6.8 quake, the strongest recorded this year, occurred as the nation was recovering from damage caused by a magnitude 6.4 temblor on Saturday night, with its epicenter in Guanshan Township (關山). That quake
‘WRONG APPROACH’: The agency, which limited peak-hour landings to address long lines at the taxi stand, should instead make more taxis available, an expert said The limit on the number of landings at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport during peak hours, imposed by the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) to address a shortage of disease prevention taxis, is like “treating a patient who has a headache by examining problems with their feet,” a tourism industry expert said yesterday. The number of international travelers arriving at Taiwan’s largest international airport surged as many countries have reopened their borders and the Central Epidemic Command Center has gradually eased Taiwan’s border controls to contain the spread of COVID-19. To ease congestion at the airport and shorten the line for disease prevention taxis,

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