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Brian Eno has left a legacy as a truly unique musical artist. After just two albums with his launchpad group Roxy Music, for whom he played synthesisers, the restless creative embarked on a solo mission to fulfil his esoteric ideals. Stepping further into the avant-garde-meets-glam-rock style of the early Roxy Music albums, Eno began with the brilliant Here Come the Warm Jets in January 1974. 
Over four solo avant-pop releases over the 1970s, Eno established himself as a skilled producer and creative mastermind. His eminence attracted the likes of David Bowie and Talking Heads in the late 1970s, who enlisted his guidance for a series of seminal albums heading towards the 1980s. Thereafter, Eno worked with U2, Coldplay and countless other prominent acts while further asserting his creative force in the field of ambient music. 
While Eno’s presence has never been one of a stadium-filling rock star on the level of Bowie or Freddie Mercury, his name crops up just about everywhere. As he once famously said: “My reputation is far bigger than my sales. I was talking to Lou Reed the other day, and he said that the first Velvet Underground record sold only 30,000 copies in its first five years.”
“Yet, that was an enormously important record for so many people. I think everyone who bought one of those 30,000 copies started a band! So I console myself in thinking that some things generate their rewards in second-hand ways.”
Discussing The Velvet Underground’s eponymous debut further with the Quietus on another occasion, Eno pointed out that the music gave him the license to pursue his dream in experimental music. “This was probably the most important pop album for me in that I think it’s the moment where I realised that I could be a musician,” Eno pondered. “It was partly that this band was semi-non-musicians, but it was also because the songs borrowed a lot from what I knew about experimental music at the time.”
On March 1st, 1974, Eno graced Dutch television with the unbridled eccentricity of his presence for a performance on TopPop. The programme was the first regular feature dedicated to pop music in the country; it ran from 1970 to 1988 with Ad Visser as the presenter for its first 15 years. Other notable artists to appear on the show during that period include David Bowie, ABBA, 10CC, Rod Stewart and Donna Summer. 
During his visit, Eno recorded a performance of ‘Seven Deadly Finns’, a strange avant-pop single released in between his first two solo albums, Here Come The Warm Jets and Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy). The televised performance sees Eno cloaked and capped like a Renaissance painter as he passionately sings a playfully sexual lyrical journey.
To cap off the stunning psychedelic visuals, Eno treats us to a stream of yodelling at the close of the song. Watch below.
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